USA

Double Handling – And Other Attempts to Gain an Edge

In attempting to define “double-handling” it should be understood that there are various attitudes toward it, so you should understand the context when using the term. It has a different meaning or at least different importance to different groups. At its root, the term means that there is some influence from outside the ring over the appearance/behavior of a dog in the ring—a second (or doubled) handler. On one end of the spectrum is the extreme position where if someone at ringside blows his nose, the AKC rep is likely to give the judge hell for allowing such “interference.” At the other extreme it may appear that someone has let all the lunatics out of the local asylum. Example: at one GSD national specialty in the Orient, as the judge was looking at posed dogs several yards further down the line, I watched screaming owners jumping into the ring to get their dogs (being shown by paid handlers) “animated”—which means that the dogs are supposed to be looking especially alert. Balls, squeaky-toys, and the like were excitedly shown to the dogs—one double-handler even had a rabbit in a cage that he shook in front of his dog’s face!

Keep in mind that the suggestions and techniques I offer here should only be used in situations where they would be allowed, or at least unnoticeable. Continue reading

Conflict


CONFLICT

Described as “the American ‘War and Peace’”, the new two-volume novel, CONFLICT,
by Fred Lanting is now available direct from the author at a special temporary (introductory) price of $60 ppd*, in the USA. See order instructions below.
Inquire about postage to other countries: Mr.GSD@juno.com .

Drawing on a background as a writer, poet, and former college instructor, as well as memories of WW-2 and Korea, the author chronicles the life of a man in conflict, Col. Stan Thomas. A pacifist who becomes a war hero, a man deeply in love who loses his young wife, a soft-spoken academic with nightmares and secrets about the men he has killed, Prof. Thomas lives a quiet public life, and tries to maintain an arm’s-length relationship with a philandering preacher with whom he seems to share some disturbing Doppelgänger similarities.







Combine all 3 of Fred’s books in one order!


But all 3 of Fred’s books for $185 and get free shipping in the continental USA.





Q&A with Fred: GSD with back problems

Is anyone familiar with Laser [“therapy”] for dogs. A 10 yr old German Shepherd that has some lower back problems. … it is supposed to be totally safe, but after the second treatment, she has been showing signs of problems with anal glands — information on ‘side effects’ ?’ —

Thanks! Ziggy


Ziggy,
With limited info on the specific nature of “back problems”, we can only guess; but fortunately, my experience in the breed makes them rather educated guesses. A GSD this old is likely to have one OR MORE of a few relatively common disorders: Could have hip dysplasia that is just now getting to the point that the wear-and-tear is hurting or restricting range of motion. Could have Cauda Equina or similar stenosis, although this
usually manifests much earlier in life. Could have spondylosis (see my Internet article on TVS, CAUDA EQUINA SYNDROME, AND SPONDYLOSIS, found onSiriusDog.

If it isn’t primarily spondylosis, it might be what is called chronic degenerative radiculomyelopathy (CDRM) in the UK or degenerative myelopathy in the USA. See if you can find my articles on this subject on that SiriusDog site… look for “The New Knowledge of DM (GSD Myelopathy)” or similar title. I’ll attach these for you, though VetMed cannot get attachments. Or, even better, get my book on orthopedic disorders, which treats of this even though it’s not a bone/joint problem.

Fred

Now accepting PayPal

I’d like to announce that this site is now accepting PayPal for ordering Fred’s Books for our client’s ease. If you wish to order one of the books and you live inside the continental USA, please click on the “Buy Now” button below each product.

After you click the button you will be redirected to the PayPal site where you can pay for these books. Your transaction will show up as PayPal and/or Canine Computing (this site’s webmaster).

Thank you all for your continued patronage and support for Fred! Also, please remember not to purchase any Orthopedics book “by Fred Lanting” with the green covers, these are illegal copes. The most recent and legal copy is the blue covered books. Feel free to use the contact button above if you have any questions.

Fred’s Books

Looking for a gift item for your veterinarian or “doggie” friends?

GREAT NEW BOOK FOR DOG-OWNER FRIENDS OR YOURSELF

Großes neues Buch für selbst oder für Freunde, die Hunde besitzen

Attention international visitors (and visitors outside the continental USA):  Please use the contact Fred form to get a quote for a book purchase.  Combining multiple orders can save on shipping so ask around if other people are interested in the book – it can lead to significant savings per person.

The new Canine Hip Dysplasia and Other Orthopedics Disorders book

It’s here! The long-awaited expanded revision of the popular HD book by Fred Lanting is finished (the first one, published in 1980, sold 10,000 copies!). This “Canine Hip Dysplasia and Other Orthopedic Disorders” book is a comprehensive (nearly 600 pages!), amply illustrated, annotated, monumental work that is suitable as a coffee-table book, a reference work for breeders and veterinarians, and a study adjunct for veterinary students. It is equally valuable for the dog trainer and the general dog owner of any breed, as there is no breed that does not have some sort of orthopedic, bone, or spinal disorder. Do not confuse it with the out-of-print 1980 work, which was much smaller. The new book covers every aspect of HD and other disorders, including genetics, diagnostic methods, treatment options, and the role that environment plays.

The author has been studying and teaching this subject since 1966, including lecturing at numerous veterinary schools and breeders’ convocations in some 30 countries throughout the world. He has been described by a former OFA director as the world’s leading non-veterinarian authority on hip dysplasia. He has been a dog breeder since 1945, a GSD owner since 1947, and a show judge since 1979.

Don’t wait! Be informed. Postal money orders or cashier’s checks are fast but may be expensive. If in Canada, send your U.S.-Federal-Reserve-approved money order or an international postal money order to: Willow Wood, 3565 Parches Cove, Union Grove, Alabama 35175-8422 USA. Other foreign buyers may prefer payment by PayPal – that can be arranged for a variable extra charge. However, Moneygram is by far the easiest and most economical method. Your First-Edition copy will be mailed as soon as the appropriate amount is received and is processed. All will be mailed from the USA. Pricing: US $70.50, plus $4.50 postage in the continental U.S., or more for surface mail overseas. Foreign purchasers can save on postage by having several books mailed to one address. ISBN 0-9764685-0-6 Copyright 2005 by Fred Lanting.

We now accept PayPal on this site (for orders inside the continental USA only), please click the link below to purchase this book though PayPal:

For orders outside the continental USA, please click on the “Contact Fred / Purchase one of his books” link above. For bulk orders (5 or more of each book) please use the contact form to inquire about bulk pricing.

Combine orders with “The Total German Shepherd Dog”

by the same author — 17 of its 20 chapters are applicable to all breeds.

($52.50 plus postage as outlined above.)
We now accept PayPal on this site (for orders inside the continental USA only), please click the link below to purchase this book though PayPal:

For orders outside the continental USA, please click on the “Contact Fred / Purchase one of his books” link above. For bulk orders (5 or more of each book) please use the contact form to inquire about bulk pricing.


If you order both books below for $125, we’ll cover the shipping costs (for orders in the continental USA only), please use the PayPal link below:

For orders outside the continental USA, please click on the “Contact Fred / Purchase one of his books” link above. For bulk orders (5 or more of each book) please use the contact form to inquire about bulk pricing.

All rights reserved. If you want to read helpful articles on dogs, go to a search engine and type in “Fred Lanting” or go to: Sirius Dog Articles, Fred on Sirius Dog, or here.
Various Articles

Permission to quote brief excerpts is allowed; otherwise no part of any work may be reproduced without prior written permission from the author: mr.gsd@netscape.com

The author is an SV conformation judge and an all-breed judge for several USA & international registries.

Join the Sieger Show Guided Tour

I take you to breeders, training clubs, and sightseeing for 4 or 5 days in addition to the 3-day show, where you can take advantage of my many years as SV breed judge.
Click the “Contact” button above to purchase one of the books!

LEGG-CALVÉ-PERTHES DISEASE

by Fred Lanting

A disorder sometimes mistaken for hip dysplasia is Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, perhaps more frequently referred to by the dog fancier as “Legg-Perthes”. This is an aseptic (not infected), developmental necrosis (dying of tissue) of the femoral head and neck, found almost entirely in toy or other small breeds. On radiographs, it often looks as if the bone is “rotting away”, and lameness is the major or only symptom. It has a history in human medicine, too. In fact, that’s where it was first discovered in 1910 by three researchers working independently. Legg, Calvé, and Perthes each saw a flattening of the femoral head (coxa plana) in affected youngsters and thought that trauma was at the heart of its etiology.

Schnelle in the 1930s first saw the disorder in the canine in Wirehaired Fox Terriers, and Moltzen-Nielsen in Germany about the same time saw it mostly in the Wires but also in a few other breeds Since then, puppies of many other small, toy, and miniature breeds between 3 and 10 months of age have been affected.

Radiographic (“X-ray”) signs of Legg-Perthes are usually gross and the course and outcome discouraging, since many cases are not referred to the vet or the specialist for diagnosis until the dog has been limping for a long time or the disease has progressed to the point that it becomes a more real problem to the owner. These small dogs put so little weight on their tiny hip joints that they almost can compensate for discomfort by “walking on their forelimbs instead of their four limbs”. Many are “couch potatoes” or spend much time being carried, but even then, picking up an affected dog in a certain manner can put more pressure on the joint than does normal locomotion, so pain at that time is often the stimulus to do something about it. Owners have reported “incredible pain” and constant, progressive discomfort, inability to stay long in any one position, and bone lysis (loss through a process akin to dissolving or consuming) at other areas in the limb distal to the hip (further away, the opposite of proximal).

The earliest radiographic signs, should you look for them before they change, include an increased radiodensity (opacity as seen on the radiograph) in the lateral part of the epiphysis of the femoral header Lateral means the part away from the mid-line or medial; the “outside”. Resorption of necrotic (dying, rotting or decomposing) trabecular bone cells is next accompanied by a lysis (dissolving or being consumed) of bone. These are replacement attempts by the body, similar to the attempt to replace bone that takes place during HD remodeling; eventually there is fracture or collapse, like a frame house riddled by termites. As HD may or may not be concurrent, the congruity of the ball-and-socket coxofemoral joint might still be maintained until collapse. See pictures at the end of this article.


Cause


The most probable cause is a genetic weakness that allows abnormal or inadequate blood supply to the ossifying epiphyses. Those are the ends or caps of long bones that are changing from cartilage in the embryo to bone in the adult. Depending upon breed and particular bone portion, ossification is usually complete by 12 months of age. Compression/pinching of the blood vessels in that area leads to the necrosis (death) of cartilage and bone tissue. One unproven idea was that some of these little dogs have excess and premature levels of androgen and estrogen hormones that influence this process.


Treatment


Various treatments have been suggested but the usual one is excision (surgical removal) of the femoral head and neck, again with a similarity to one of the HD operations performed on dogs.

Conservative treatment (as opposed to “heroic measures” such as surgery) has been suggested for those unilaterally limping dogs (lame on only one side and supported well by the other limb) with good congruity and no collapse or deterioration. The dog’s worse limb is put into an Ehmer sling for a time, perhaps as much as a couple of months, then the dog is kept in a crate to minimize activity for another few weeks perhaps, during which time the dog is periodically radiographed. If this approach is successful, the resorbed bone is replaced in a normal manner and radiopacity returns, indicating normal bone cells and regained strength. In such cases, aseptic necrosis is halted and then reversed by keeping the dog’s weight off the limb. Lameness has been reported to cease in perhaps a quarter of dogs treated conservatively, but much of this estimate depends on owners’ reports rather than always being followed up by veterinary examination.

A syndicated column called “To Your Good Health” in the Clarksburg (WV) Telegram of June 30, 1994 included a brief discussion by Paul Donohue, M.D., responding to a reader’s request for advice. Her 8-year old child had recently been diagnosed with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease and she had seen no improvement after 3 months in a brace. By the way, human infants with HD are put into slings or casts which keep the legs spread apart until the joint begins to strengthen; did you know that people get HD, too? Anyway, Dr. Donohue told her that the Legg-Calvé-Perthes disorder involved a cutting off of the blood supply to the epiphysis (top part of the femur) and that it might take more than a year for the brace to rest the hip enough so that restoration of blood supply can help restore bone there. If unsuccessful after that long a wait, surgery may be needed, he advised. So you see, your dogs are not the only ones at risk for this problem.

Some of us may not have heard of any of our specific breeds diagnosed with Legg-Perthes yet, but that may be because, to many veterinarians, the radiograph looks like hip dysplasia, and it is not sent in to experts for diagnosis and recording of data. On the other hand, I have seen many HD cases mistakenly diagnosed as LCP. If you come across a case of Legg-Perthes in your breed, please report it (accurately, with name and address of person diagnosing it) to the health committee and/or magazine editor of your club.


Copyright, Fred Lanting, 1994. Permission to reprint available if the notice about the new orthopedics book is attached. If you don’t see these below, e-mail: Mr.GSD@NetScape.com for copies. The following or similar notice should also accompany the article:
The new “Canine HD and Other Orthopedics Disorders” book is here! The long-awaited expanded revision now in its second printing is a comprehensive (nearly 600 pages!), amply illustrated, annotated, monumental work that is suitable as a coffee-table book, a reference work for breeders and veterinarians, and a study adjunct for veterinary students. Be sure to look for the blue cover. Do not confuse it with the much smaller out-of-print 1980 work. $73 ppd in the USA. Combine orders with “The Total German Shepherd Dog” by the same author ($50 plus postage). 17 of the 20 chapters are suitable for owners of any breed.
(c) Fred Lanting, mr.gsd@netscape.com . The author is an international dog show judge and lecturer on such topics as canine orthopedic problems, gait-&-structure, the evolution of the modern GSD, and other topics. Seminars can be arranged.

Need a Handler?

For that special show, do you need an experienced handler of GSDs?

I am well known by almost all SV judges (having been one myself for many years), and am as fit as anyone for the task As a judge, I don’t want to charge a handling fee, just a pro-rated share of expenses (the more dogs, the more economical). Whether WUSV, USA, WDA, or other major show anywhere in the world. There’s good reason why I’m known as “Mr.GSD”.