SchH-VPG-3 translated (by Fred Lanting) to English

Three divisions: Phase A 100 points

Phase B 100 points

Phase C 100 points

Total: 300 points

SchH/VPG-3, Phase “A”: TRACKING

A track is laid by someone else with its course unknown to the handler: at least 600 steps, 5 legs, 4 corners (approximately 90°), and 3 scent articles supplied by the tracklayer and left on the track for at least 60 minutes. Time allowed for completion is 15 minutes.

Holding to the track: 80 points

Finding articles (7 + 7 + 6 points): 20 points
Total: 100 points

General regulations:

The trial judge or his designee determines the course and suitability of each track at the available tracking fields. The tracks must be designed differently. For example, it may not be that the corners and the placing of dropped articles in each track are identical. The starting point of the track must be marked well by a sign or marker stuck in the ground on the left side of the starting point.

The sequence of the participants (order of tracking) is drawn by lots by the judge after the tracks are laid.

The tracklayer has to show the articles to the judge or someone answerable to him, before the start of the track. Only well “aged” scent articles, left for at least 60 minutes on the track, may be used. The tracklayer lingers briefly on the starting point and then goes with normal steps in the direction designated by the judge. The corners are also made at normal pace. The first article is dropped after at least 100 steps on either the 1st or 2nd leg, at the judge’s direction. The second object is dropped wherever the judge advises, and the third one at the end of the track. The articles must be placed while moving. After dropping the last article, the tracklayer must continue walking some steps straight ahead in the same direction. Different articles must be used, made of leather, textile, and wood. The article length must be a maximum of approximately 10 cm [about 4 inches], with a width of 2-3 cm [a little over an inch], and a thickness of 0.5-1 cm [less than half an inch]. They may not stand out much in color from the terrain on which they are dropped. All articles are to be visibly numbered, and those numbers are to agree with the ones in the records that the judge and trial manager have. During the laying of the track, the dog and handler must be out of sight.

The judge, tracklayer, and assistants or companions may not be within the working range of the dog; i.e., where the handler and dog are searching.

a) Voice Command

Example of a command to begin searching = Such!

The commands to “search” are permitted at the start of the track, and after the first and second articles.

b) Performance of the Exercise

The handler brings his dog to the track. The dog may search freely, or on a 10-meter long line. The 10-m tracking lead can lie over the back, at the side, or between the front and/or hind legs. It can either be directly fastened to the “dead ring” of the approved collar or to a tracking harness (allowed is a chest harness or a Böttger harness, without additional straps).

After being summoned for their test, the dog handler reports with his dog (in the basic position) to the judge near or at the starting position, tells the judge his and his dog’s names, and whether his dog will pick up the articles or indicate their position. Before the track, during the search, and throughout the total exercise, there must not be any psychological pressure given to the dog. Upon instruction of the judge, the handler leads the dog slowly and steadily to the starting point. The dog must right away take the scent intensely, calmly, and with a deep nose. The dog must continue then with deep nose, in a constant, steady tempo, intensely following the course. The handler follows his dog at the 10-meter distance, whether at the end of the tracking lead or doing a free search (without lead or line). The tracking lead may sag, as long as it is not dropped by the handler. The dog must work out the corners surely. After the corner, the dog must continue searching at the same speed. As soon as the dog has found an article, it must immediately pick it up or convincingly indicate its location without influence from the handler. The dog may remain standing when picking it up, sit, or come to the handler. Going on with the article, or picking it up while lying down, are faulty. The indications can be accomplished by lying, sitting or standing (or any combination of these). If the dog has indicated or picked up the article, the handler drops the tracking lead and proceeds to his dog. By lifting of the articles, he shows that the dog has found them. After this, the handler picks up the tracking lead again and continues the track with his dog 10 meters ahead. After completion of the track, the found articles are to be shown to the judge.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

The speed of search is not a criterion in the performance appraisal, as long as the track work is intense, steady, and convincing, with the dog showing a positive search attitude. Exuberance (without leaving the track) is not faulty. Inattentiveness, high nose, voiding (urinating or defecating), circling at the corners, constant encouragement, using the line or verbal assistance during the track or at the articles, is faulty, as is incorrect picking up or indicating of the articles; points are deducted accordingly. If the dog leaves the track more than the length of a tracking lead, the track is halted; the exercise is over. If the dog leaves the track and is held back from doing so by the handler, the judge will order the handler to follow the dog. If this order is not followed, the tracking is to be halted by the judge. If the end of the track is not reached within 20 minutes after arriving at the starting point, the tracking is halted by the judge. The performance up to that discontinuance is rated.

If a dog both indicates and picks up articles on the track, this is faulty. Only the scent articles that were exhibited and approved at the beginning are allowed. Indication faults are recorded in connection with the evaluation/scoring of the respective legs.

No points will be awarded if articles are neither indicated nor picked up.

The distribution or allotment of points for holding to the track on each leg will be made according to length and degree of difficulty. Evaluation of the respective legs is made by the judge after consulting his notes and adding the points. If the dog does not actively search (if it dwells in place for too long without searching for the track), the exercise can also be stopped then, even if the dog is still on the track course.

SchH/VPG-3, Phase “B”: OBEDIENCE

Exercise 1: Off-lead Heeling 10 points

Exercise 2: Sit out of Motion 10 points

Exercise 3: Down and Recall 10 points

Exercise 4: Stand out of Motion 10 points

Exercise 5: Retrieve on Flat Ground 10 points

Exercise 6: Retrieve over 1-m Hurdle 15 points

Exercise 7: Retrieve over the Incline Wall 15 points

Exercise 8: The Go-out and Down 10 points

Exercise 9: Lying Still with Distraction 10 points

Total: 100 points

General Regulations:

The working out of the exercises — the start, etc. — is implemented without any instruction from the judge.

The voice commands are already established in the rules (for VPG-1 and -2). Orders to the dog are spoken in a normal voice, and are short, single-word commands. They can be given in any language; however for each activity they always must be the same. If, after the third command, a dog does not execute an exercise or a part of an exercise, the respective exercise is to be stopped without a score for that part. For the recall, the name of the dog can be used in lieu of the action command, but not both. The name of the dog together with any voice command is considered as double voice commands.

In the starting position (“basic position”) for heeling, the dog sits close and straight at the left side of the handler so that the shoulder of the dog is close to the knee of the handler. Each exercise begins and ends with the basic position. Setting up the basic position is allowed only once at the beginning of any exercise. A short praise is allowed after each finished exercise, but only in the basic position. After that, the handler can take a new starting place and, for the dog, a new basic position. A clear time interval (approximately 3 seconds) must be observed, in any case, between praise and a new beginning.

From the basic position, the so-called “development” is worked out. The team must take at least 10, and at most 15, steps before a voice command is given for the performance of any different part of an exercise. Between the parts of an exercise and at its conclusion, clear pauses (approx. 3 seconds) are to be observed before the delivery of a subsequent command. This includes the pauses before and after taking up a new basic heel position, as well as when returning to the dog that is sitting, standing, or lying at a distance. When picking up the dog, the handler can step in front of, or go around behind, his dog to the basic position.

The off-lead heeling is to be maintained while moving between exercises or their parts. The dog must also accompany the handler when getting the dumbbell for the retrieve. A loose grip or playing with the dumbbell is not allowed.

The about-face is to be executed by the handler pivoting to the left. During the about-face, the dog can either finish (go to heel) behind the handler or cross in front, the execution of which must be the same every time.

When commanded to heel, the dog can either go around behind the handler or turn in front to get to the basic position. This “finish” must be in the same style each time.

The solid 1-meter hurdle [no soft or brush top] has a height of 100 cm and a width of 150 cm. The incline wall is composed of two climbing walls of 150 cm width and 191 cm length, joined at the top. These two walls stand on the ground with the bottoms set apart so that the vertical height of the A-frame is 180 cm. The whole surface of the incline wall must be furnished with a skid-proof covering. There are 3 horizontal climbing ledges on each side, approximately 24/48 mm (1X2 inches) in cross-section. All dogs in any competition must climb the same or equal obstacles.

For the retrieves, only wooden dumbbells are allowed. Weights are about 2000 grams (4.4 pounds) for the retrieve on the flat, and 650 grams (1.4 pounds) for the 1-meter hurdle and the incline wall. The dumbbells provided by the club that is hosting the trial must be used by all participants. The dumbbells may not be given the dog before throwing it.

If the handler should forget an exercise, the handler receives a request by the judge to perform the missing exercise, without point deduction.

1. Off-lead heeling 10 points

a) Command

An example of a command for heeling or going to basic position = Fuß! (Fuss!)

This voice command is allowed only when starting the exercise and changing pace.

b) Performance of the Exercise

The handler proceeds to the judge with his dog heeling off-lead, and introduces himself and his dog. From the basic position, and upon the handler’s voice command to heel, the dog must attentively, joyfully, quickly, and closely remain at heel, with its shoulder blade always even with the handler’s left knee and without leaning or crowding. When the handler stops, the dog must automatically and independently sit straight and promptly without any help. Beginning the exercise, the handler and dog go 50 steps (paces) straight ahead without stopping, perform the about-face, and return 10 to 15 steps at a normal brisk pace, followed by running, then the slow walk, and again the normal speed, with each respective segment at least 10 steps and no more than 15. The transition from the run to the slow pace must be executed without intermediate steps. The three (normal, run, and slow) must differ clearly in the speed.

Continuing in the normal walking speed, the team executes at least one turn right, one left turn, and one about-face turn. A stop/sit is to be shown at least once in this portion, and during the normal pace. While the handler and dog are in the normal pace, in the first part of their straight-ahead free-heeling routine, two gunshots (approx. 6 mm caliber) are delivered within 5 seconds at a distance of at least 15 paces from the team. The dog must be indifferent to the gunshots. At the end of the exercise, and as indicated by the judge, the handler goes with his dog into a moving group of at least four persons.

The handler/dog team must go around some of the people, making one circle to the right and one to the left, and include at least one stop/sit in the group. It is the judge’s option to demand a repetition [for example, if the team stops too far from any person in the group]. The team then leaves the group and takes up the basic position for the start of the next exercise.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

(Applies to entire exercise): If the dog forges or heels wide (is not in the correct relationship to the handler’s left side), hangs back, is slow or hesitant in sitting, requires additional voice commands or body language help, or shows poor attention in the heeling and/or turns, or shows lack of spirit, the dog is penalized accordingly.

2. Sit out of Motion 10 points

a) Commands

Examples of commands for the dog to heel and sit = Fuß and Sit/Sitz

b) Performance of the Exercise

Starting in the basic position, the handler proceeds straight ahead with his dog [heeling off leash, as always]. After 10-15 steps, the dog must immediately, and facing in the same direction, sit down when the voice command for the “Sit” is given, without the handler interrupting his pace, changing speed, or looking back. After another 30 steps the handler stops and immediately turns around to face his calm and steadily sitting dog. Upon order by the judge, the handler returns and stations himself at the dog’s right side.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Errors in the “development” (general working out of the heeling), slow to sit on command, and/or restless, inattentive sitting are penalized accordingly. If the dog lies down or stands instead of sitting, 5 points are deducted.

3. The Drop (Down) with Recall 10 points

a) Commands

Commands to heel, lie down, come on the recall, and finish (go to basic position) =

Fuß, Platz, Heir (or the call name of the dog), and Fuß (again).

b) Performance

From the basic position the team marches straight ahead. After 10-15 steps at normal speed, they run for another 10-15 steps, when the dog must immediately drop to a lying position, facing straight ahead, as the voice command to “lie down” is given. Without changing pace or looking back, the handler continues walking. After an additional 30 running paces, the handler stops and turns around immediately to face his calmly lying dog. Upon instruction by the judge, the handler calls his dog with the command to come (“Hier” or the name of the dog). The dog must approach joyfully, quickly, and directly; it must sit closely and straight facing the handler. On the command to heel to the “basic position”, the dog must quickly go to the left side of its handler, and sit straight with its shoulder even with the handler’s knee.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Any errors in the development, slow to lie down, being restless during the down, slow to react to the recall command, slowing down during the approach, incorrect position (such as wide stance of the handler’s feet, faulty sit, and/or poor finish, will result in points being deducted accordingly. If, after the command to “Platz”, the dog stands or sits instead of lying down, 5 points are deducted.

4. Stand out of Motion 10 points

a) Commands

Commands to heel, stand, come, finish (to heel position) = Fuß, Steh, Hier, Fuß

b) Performance of the Exercise

From the basic position the team runs straight ahead, the dog heeling free. After 10-15 steps, and on the command to stand (Steh!), the dog must stop immediately and remain standing in the direction of travel. The handler continues running without changing pace or looking back. After an additional 30 paces the handler stops and turns around immediately to face his calmly standing dog. Upon instruction by the judge, the handler calls his dog to himself with either the Hier! command or the dog’s name, not both. The dog must approach joyfully, fast, and directly, and must sit close and straight before the handler. Upon the handler’s command, the dog must quickly go to the basic position and sit straight with its shoulder next to the handler’s left leg.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Errors in the “development” (general working out of the exercise), such as refusal or slowness to stand on command, a restless stand, coming early toward the handler, slow to respond to the recall or slowing down while coming in, wide stance of the handler, and poor sit in front or in basic position at the conclusion of that exercise are penalized accordingly. If the dog sits or lies down instead of standing, 5 points are deducted.

5. Retrieve on the Flat 10 points

a) Commands

For retrieving, releasing, and returning to basic heel position = Bring, Aus, and Fuß

b) Performance of the Exercise

From the basic position the handler throws a dumbbell (weight 2,000 grams) about 10 paces away. The command to “Bring” may be given only as soon as the dumbbell lies still. The dog, which has been steady and unrestrainedly sitting beside its handler, must run on the “Bring” command to the dumbbell, pick it up immediately and bring it to his handler; all must be done quickly and directly. The dog must sit close and straight in front of and facing its handler and must hold the dumbbell steadily in the mouth for a pause of approximately 3 seconds, then release it to the handler when commanded to “Aus!” (let go). The handler must be able to reach the dumbbell with an outstretched arm. After the delivery, he holds it motionless at his right side. On the command to “Fuß”, the dog must quickly go to the left side of its handler with its shoulder even with the handler’s knee and sit facing straight ahead. The handler may not leave his position during this exercise.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Errors in the basic position, slow running out, picking up the dumbbell, slow coming back, dropping the dumbbell, playing or chewing with it, sitting crooked in front of or beside the handler in the finish (Fuß), and wide stance by the handler are penalized accordingly. Throwing the dumbbell too short, and helps (extra commands/movements) by the handler, even if he does not change his position, are likewise reflected in point deductions. If the handler leaves his location before the conclusion has been attained, the exercise will be rated as Faulty (Unsatisfactory). If the dog does not retrieve, the exercise is to be scored as 0 points.

6. Retrieve over the 1-meter Hurdle 15 points

a) Commands

Sample commands for jumping, retrieving, releasing, and finish = Hopp, Bring, Aus, Fuß

b) Performance

The handler stops with his dog in the basic position, at a distance of at least 5 paces before the hurdle. From this position the handler throws a dumbbell (weight 650 gram) over a 100-cm high hurdle. The command to jump may only be given as soon as the dumbbell lies still. The dog that has been sitting steadily and unrestrained beside his handler must jump on command (such as Hopp); the “Bring” command must be given while the dog is going over the hurdle. The dog must quickly and directly run to the dumbbell, take it immediately, and promptly jump back over the hurdle and bring the dumbbell to its handler — again, doing so quickly and directly. The dog has to sit close and straight in front, and hold the dumbbell steadily in its mouth; after a pause of approx. 3 seconds, the handler takes the dumbbell with the release command, “Aus”. The dumbbell must be grasped from within reach of the handler’s out-stretched arm, and then held at his right side. On the command to heel to the basic position, the dog go quickly to the left side of its handler and sit facing straight ahead, with shoulder blade even with the handler’s knee. The handler may not leave his position during this exercise.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Errors such as in heeling (basic) position, slow jumping, slow going out or returning; in taking, dropping, playing with, or chewing the dumbbell; the handler taking a wide stance, and poor sit or heel position (finish) will result in appropriate deductions. Striking the hurdle while jumping will cost up to 1 point, and putting feet on the hurdle will have up to 2 points deducted.

Point allocation for retrieve over the hurdle:
Jump going away Retrieve Jump coming back

5 points 5 points 5 points

A partial score for the exercise is only possible if at least two of these three parts are completed.

Jumping and retrieving flawlessly = 15 points

A jump going away or one returning not executed, but

the dumbbell flawlessly brought back = 10 points

The jumps in both directions being flawless, but the
dumbbell not brought back = 10 points

If the dumbbell lands considerably to the side, or where the dog would have a bad problem seeing it, the handler (after asking or being told by the judge to try again) can throw the bringing wood without point cancellation. The dog must remain sitting while the handler gets the dumbbell.

Handler helps, even without changing location, are given appropriate point deductions. If the handler leaves his position before the conclusion of the exercise, it is rated as unsatisfactory.

7. Retrieve over the 180-cm Incline Wall 15 points

a) Commands

For jumping, retrieving, releasing, and going to basic position = Hopp, Bring, Aus, Fuß

b) Performance

The handler stops with his dog in the basic position, at a distance of at least 5 paces before the hurdle (wall). From this position the handler throws a dumbbell (weight 650 gram) over the incline wall.

The dog that has been sitting steadily and unrestrained beside his handler must, on command (such as Hopp), climb over the incline wall quickly and directly (the “Bring” command only being given while the dog is going over the wall), run to the dumbbell, immediately take it, and immediately return over the incline wall and bring the dumbbell to its handler, this being done quickly and directly.

The dog has to sit close and straight in front and hold the dumbbell calmly in its mouth; after a pause of approximately 3 seconds, the handler takes the dumbbell with the release command, “Aus”. The dumbbell must be within reach of the handler’s out-stretched arm, and after being taken, held at his right side. On the command to heel to the basic position, the dog go quickly to the left side of its handler and sit facing straight ahead, with shoulder blade even with the handler’s knee. The handler may not leave his position during this exercise.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Errors in heeling or the basic position; slowness in leaving, jumping, returning; in taking, dropping, playing with, or chewing the dumbbell; the handler taking a wide stance, or errors in the dog’s sit or heel positions will result in appropriate deductions.

Point allocation for retrieve over the wall:
Jump going away Retrieve Jump coming back

5 points 5 points 5 points

A partial score for the exercise is only possible if at least two of these three parts are completed.

Jumping and retrieving flawlessly = 15 points

A jump going away or one returning not executed, but

the dumbbell flawlessly brought back = 10 points

The jumps in both directions being flawless, but the
dumbbell not brought back = 10 points

If the dumbbell lands considerably to the side, or where the dog would have a bad problem seeing it, the handler (after asking or being told by the judge to try again) can throw the dumbbell again without a point deduction. The dog must remain sitting while the handler gets the dumbbell.

Handler helps, even without changing location, are given appropriate point deductions. If the handler leaves his position before the conclusion of the exercise, it is evaluated as Unsatisfactory/Faulty.

8. The Go-out with Lying Down on Command

a) Commands

Commands for the go-out, drop, and sit = Fuß, Voraus, Platz, Sitz

b) Performance

From the starting point and basic position the team goes straight ahead in the designated direction, the dog off-lead as always. After 10-15 steps the handler gives the dog the command for “the go-out” (Voraus!), simultaneously raising a single arm and standing still. At this, the dog must run purposefully, straight, and fast for a distance equivalent to at least 30 human paces, in the direction indicated. Upon the judge’s order, the handler gives the command to “lie down” (Platz!), whereupon the dog must lie down immediately. The handler may hold his arm up as a directive until then. Upon another order by the judge, the handler goes to his dog and steps to its right side. After approximately 3 seconds, and after the judge indicates, the handler gives the command to sit, and the dog must do so quickly and straight in the basic position.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Errors in the development such as continuing with the handler, too slow running out, deviating too far to the side, going too short a distance, lying down prematurely or with hesitation, restless while lying, and/or prematurely getting up when the handler goes to the dog, are given appropriate point deductions.

9. Long Down under Distraction 10 points

a) Commands
Commands for the long-down exercise = Fuß, Platz, Sitz

b) Performance

At the beginning of phase “B”, when another dog is to perform its routine, the handler takes his dog to a place designated by the judge, drops the dog from the basic position with the “Platz!” command, and leaves the dog without any leash or other article. The handler goes without looking back, at least 30 steps away from the dog, and stands still in view of the dog but with his back to it (still within the trial area). The dog must lie there quietly and still without the handler’s influence while the other dog performs exercises 1 through 7. Upon order of the judge, the handler returns to his dog and steps to its right side. After approximately 3 seconds, after an indication from the judge, the dog must sit up on command, quickly and straight in the basic position.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Restless conduct by the handler as well as other hidden helps (body language), the dog being restless while lying and/or getting up too early when being picked up, are errors resulting in point deductions. If the dog stands or sits prematurely yet remains in the place where it had been lying, it results in a partial point score. If the dog strays more than 3 meters before the other dog has completed its exercise # 5, then this exercise is to be given a zero (0). If it leaves that place after the other dog’s completion of the 5th exercise, it receives a partial score. If the dog comes to meet the approaching handler, a deduction of up to 3 points takes place.

SchH/VPG-3, Phase “C”: PROTECTION

Exercise 1: Quartering for the Helper (Search 6 Blinds) 5 points

Exercise 2: Hold and Bark 10 points

Exercise 3: Prevention of Helper’s Escape Attempt 10 points

Exercise 4: Defense of Attack during Guarding 20 points

Exercise 5: Back Transport 5 points

Exercise 6: Assault on the Dog from Back Transport 15 points

Exercise 7: Assault on the Dog from a Distance 10 points

Exercise 8: Defense of Attack during Guarding 20 points

Total 100 points

General Regulations:

At a suitable location, 6 blinds are set up with 3 on each side of the field in a staggered arrangement. These must be clearly visible for handler, judge, and helper.

The helper must be supplied with protective clothing, Schutzhund sleeve, and padded stick. The protective sleeve must be equipped with a bite bar, and the cover made from natural jute. If it is necessary for the helper to keep the dog looking him in the eye, the helper does not need to stand absolutely quietly in the blind during this guarding phase. However, he may make no threatening or defensive maneuvers. He must protect his body [cover vulnerable parts] with the Schutzhund sleeve. The manner in which the dog handler takes the padded stick from helper is left up to him. [He can stay with the dog and reach forward to take it, or leave the dog and take it before returning to the basic position.] (See also “helper regulations” in WUSV rulebook).

At Schutzhund/VPG trials, one helper can be used for all levels, but if there are seven or more dogs in the trial, two helpers should be used. The same helper must be used for all handlers within any one trial level.

Dogs that do not stay in the control of the handler, or that will not “out” (Aus!) after the defense exercises or do so only through the active influence of the handler, or that bite other parts of the body than the proffered Schutzhund sleeve, must be disqualified. As a result, no TSB rating is given.

If a dog refuses to engage or defend its handler in the attack/defense exercise, or leaves the area, this phase “C” is to be halted. The dog is given no appraisal. The “TSB” evaluation has to be accomplished.

The command for the release (“Aus”), if needed, is allowed one time during each defense exercise. The evaluation for the “out” is in the point-deduction table below.
Hesitant
“Out” First additional (2nd) command
with immediate
“out” First additional
(2nd) command
with hesitant
“out” Second additional
(3rd) command
with immediate
“out” Second additional
(3rd) command
with hesitant
“out” No “out” after
second additional
(at the 4th) command
0.5-3.0 3.0 3.5-6.0 6.0 6.5-9.0 Disqualification

1. Search the Blinds for the Helper 5 points

a) Commands

Commands for the blind search by tacking (quartering or sweeping the field side-to-side), and calling the dog back (this can include the use of the dog’s name as well as the “recall”) = Voran or Revier, Hier.

b) Performance

The helper is found hiding in the last blind, initially out of view of the dog. The handler with his freely heeling dog starts before the first hiding place, so that six lateral run-outs are possible. Upon instruction of the judge, the working out of Phase “C” begins. With short voice commands such as “Revier!” and hand signals with the right or left arm (which may be repeated), the dog must quickly leave the handler in order to purposefully, closely, and attentively circle the blinds. As the dog implements each sweep to the side, the handler calls the dog (“Hier!”) toward himself and directs it during the movement toward the subsequent blinds with a renewed command to “Revier!” The handler proceeds in a normal walking speed along the aforementioned centerline, which he may not leave during the dog’s searches. The dog must always be ahead of the handler. When the dog reaches the helper’s hiding place, the handler must stop and remain standing, and no further voice commands and/or hand signals are allowed.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Deficiencies in control of or by the dog, in regard to brisk and purposeful attempts to find the helper, as well as in close and attentive circling of the blinds, result in appropriate deductions.

2. Hold and Bark 10 points

a) Commands

Commands for the recall, finish/heel = Hier, Fuß

b) Performance

The dog must actively and attentively “hold” (guard) the helper with persistent barking. The dog may not jump onto the helper, nor grab him. After staying there for approximately 20 seconds, and after an order from the judge, the handler directly approaches to within 5 paces of the blind. After another directive from the judge, the handler calls his dog into the basic position.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Deficiencies in guarding with continuous, determined barking and very eagerly pressing the helper to keep him in his place, or this activity being influenced by voice commands or the presence of the judge or the approaching handler, are scored accordingly. For persistent barking, 5 points will be awarded. If the dog barks only weakly, it will get 2 points, and if it does not bark yet remains actively and attentively guarding the helper, 5 points are deducted. “Bothering” the helper (biting, jumping on, bumping, etc.) will cost them up to 2 points, and strong grips up to 9 points. If the dog leaves the helper before the judge’s order is given for the handler to leave the centerline where he was to stop, the dog can be ordered once more to go to the helper (Revier). If the dog then remains at the helper and barking, Phase “C” can be continued; however, a rating of Unsatisfactory/Faulty is given. If the dog does not renew his bark-and-hold, or if the dog leaves the helper a second time, Phase “C” is terminated at that point. If the dog comes to meet the handler when he approaches the blind, or comes to the handler before being called off, it is given a partial score and rated as Unsatisfactory/Faulty.

3. Prevention of Escape Attempts by the Helper: 10 points

a) Voice Commands

Commands for finish, down, out (release the bite) = Fuß, Platz, Aus.

b) Performance

On the judge’s order, the handler calls the helper to step out from the blind. The helper proceeds at a normal walk to the designated starting point for the escape attempt. Following an indication by the judge, the handler proceeds with his freely heeling dog to a designated waiting place to prepare for the escape attempt. The distance between helper and dog is about 5 paces. The handler then puts his guarding dog in a “Platz” (down) position, leaves it, and hides behind the blind, but he must still be able to observe the dog, the helper and the judge.

Following an order/signal from the judge, the helper undertakes an escape attempt. The dog must frustrate this attempt without hesitation, independently, effectively, and with energetic and robust gripping. It may only attack the helper by biting him on the Schutzhund sleeve. Upon the judge’s order, the helper stands still. After the helper stops the struggle, the dog must release immediately. The handler can also give a voice command for “Aus” after an appropriate time.

If the dog does not “out” after the first allowed command, the handler receives the judge’s direction to give up to two further voice commands for the “out”. If the dog does not “out” after the third command (one allowed without deduction and two additional), it results in a disqualification. During the “Aus!” command, the handler must stand still, without otherwise influencing the dog. After the release, the dog must remain close to the helper and guard him attentively.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Not meeting the essentials of the following important performance criteria results in appropriate deductions: fast, energetic reaction, fast pursuit with robust grip and effective prevention of the escapee’s flight, full and steady grip up until the stopping of the fight by the helper. If the dog remains lying when the helper tries to run away, or does not stop the flight through grabbing and holding on within approximately 20 steps, the exercise and the rest of “C” are terminated.

If the dog in the bark-and-hold process of guarding is slightly inattentive and/or slightly bothering the helper, about one point is deducted from the exercise. If the dog is very inattentive and/or is strongly annoying the helper, around two points are deducted from the exercise. If the dog does not hold (guard) the aid, yet remains in place, around three points are taken off. If the dog leaves the helper, or if the handler gives a command to make sure that the dog remains at the helper, Phase “C” is terminated.

4. Defense of an Attack from the Guarding Exercise: 20 points

a) Commands

Commands for release (the “out”) and finish to heel position = Aus, Fuß

b) Performance

After about 5 seconds of the guarding phase, the helper on order of the judge undertakes an attack on the dog. Without influence by the handler, the dog must defend itself through energetic and strong gripping. It may attack the helper only on the Schutzhund sleeve. Once the helper has been grabbed by the dog, he gives it two stick hits. Only blows to the area around the shoulder blades and withers are permitted. The helper stands still when ordered to by the judge. After the helper stops struggling and fighting, the dog must release its grip immediately. After an appropriate time the handler can, without direction from the judge, give a voice command to “Aus!”

If the dog does not “out” after the first command, the handler receives the judge’s order for up to two further commands to “out” (Aus!). If the dog does not release after these commands (one allowed and two additional) it results in a disqualification. During the command to “out” the handler must calmly stand still, without otherwise influencing the dog. After the “out”, the dog must remain close to the helper and guard him attentively. When the judge gives the signal, the handler goes at a normal walk directly to his dog and takes him up to the basic position with a command to heel (Fuß). The padded stick is not taken from the helper at this stage.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Not meeting the essentials of the following important performance criteria results in appropriate deductions: fast, energetic reaction and robust gripping; full and calm, steady grip up until the “out”, and, after that release, close and attentive guarding of the helper.

If the dog in the bark-and-hold process of guarding is slightly inattentive and/or slightly bothering the helper, about one point is deducted from the exercise. If the dog is very inattentive and/or is strongly annoying the helper, then around two points are deducted from the exercise. If the dog does not hold (guard) the aid, yet remains in place, around 3 points are taken off. If the dog comes to meet the approaching handler, the exercise is evaluated as Unsatisfactory/Faulty. If the dog leaves the helper before the judge instructs the handler to come closer, or if the handler gives a command so that the dog remains at the helper, Phase “C” is terminated.

5. Back Transport 5 points

a) Command

A heel command is given to the dog in this exercise = Fuß

b) Performance

At the conclusion of Exercise 4, the back transport commences. The returning of the helper (under the watchful eye of the dog) to the judge takes place over a distance of approximately 30 paces. The judge determines the pattern and procedure of transport. The handler tells the “arrested” helper to move out and follows with his free-heeling and attentively observing dog at a distance of 5 paces behind the helper. This distance of 5 paces must be maintained during the entire back transport.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Any failure to meet the following important performance criteria results in appropriate deductions: attentively watching the helper, accurate heeling, and keeping a distance of 5 paces.

6. Assault on the Dog from Back Transport 15 points

a) Command

A heel command is given to the dog in this exercise = Aus, Fuß

b) Performance

During the back transport an assault is made on the dog. In the middle of his continuing march, and upon instruction by the judge, the helper turns and attacks the dog. Without waiting for any signal by the handler, the dog unhesitatingly must defend itself by energetic and strong gripping. It may attack the helper only at the protection sleeve. After the dog sets its grasp, the handler must stop and stand still. At the instruction of the judge, the helper stops struggling. As soon as he does, the dog must “out” immediately. The handler can give the command to “Aus!” after giving the dog appropriate time to release.

If the dog does not release after the first permitted command, then the handler receives the judge’s indication for up to two further commands to “out”. If the dog does not release after these commands (the one permitted with no deduction, and two additional), it is disqualified. While giving the command “Aus!” the handler must stand calmly without otherwise influencing the dog. After releasing its grip, the dog must remain close to the helper and guard him attentively. Upon the judge’s instruction, the handler goes at a normal pace, directly to his dog and tells it to go to the basic position with the command “Fuß!” The padded stick is taken from the helper this time.

A side transport of the helper follows, over a distance of approximately 20 paces, in order to deliver him to the judge. The command “Move out”, “March”, or something similar, is permitted. The dog has to walk at the right side of the helper, so that the dog is between the helper and the handler. The dog must attentively watch the helper during this transport. It may not bother or pressure the helper, jump on him, or seize him. The group continues toward and stops before the judge, the handler gives the soft stick to the judge, and “reports out” by announcing that part 1 of the protection work has been accomplished.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Any failure to meet the following important performance criteria results in appropriate deductions: fast and robust gripping, full calm and steady grip up until it releases, and close and attentive guarding of the helper after that “out”.

If the dog in the process of guarding is slightly inattentive and/or slightly annoys the helper, about one point is deducted from the exercise. If the dog is very inattentive and/or strongly bothers the helper, around two points are deducted. If the dog does not guard the helper, yet remains at the helper, around three points are deducted. If the dog leaves the helper to meet the approaching handler, the exercise will be rated as Unsatisfactory/Faulty. If the dog leaves the helper before the judge’s order for the handler to approach the dog, or the handler gives a voice command in order to keep the dog at the helper, the exercise and the rest of “C” are then interrupted (terminated).

7. Running Attack on the Dog (Long-distance Defense) 10 points

a) Commands

Commands for sitting, attack/defend, “out”, finish, heel, march (move out) = Sitz, Stell or Voran (or equivalent such as Packen!), Aus, Fuß, etc.

b) Performance

The handler proceeds with his dog to the designated place on the centerline of the field even with the first blind. The dog can be held by the collar, but may not be stimulated by the handler. Upon an order from the judge the helper, furnished with a padded stick, steps from his hiding-place at the other end of the field, and goes in a normal brisk walk to the centerline. He then proceeds to run toward, threaten, and attack the team, without interruption. He makes threatening sounds and violently threatening movements directed frontally at the handler and his dog. As soon as the helper gets to about 60 steps of them, the handler on signal from the judge releases his dog with the command to repel the attacker (“Packen!” etc.) for their defense. The dog must avert the attack without hesitation, through energetic and robust gripping. It may attack the helper only on the Schutzhund sleeve. The handler may not leave his position. The helper discontinues the fight upon order of the judge. When he stops struggling and fighting, the dog must release its grip immediately. After an appropriate time the handler can, without direction from the judge, give a voice command to “Aus!”

If the dog does not “out” after the first command, the handler receives the judge’s order for up to two further commands to “out” (Aus!). If the dog does not release after these commands (one allowed and two additional) it results in a disqualification. During the command to “out” the handler must stand still, without otherwise influencing the dog. After the “out”, the dog must remain close to the helper and guard him attentively.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Any failure to meet the following important performance criteria results in appropriate deductions: fast and robust gripping, full and steady grip up until the “out”, and after that release, a close and attentive guarding of the helper.

If the dog in the process of guarding is slightly inattentive and/or slightly annoys the helper, about one point is deducted from the exercise. If the dog is very inattentive and/or strongly bothers the helper, around two points are deducted. If the dog does not guard the helper, yet remains at the helper, around three points are deducted. If the dog leaves the helper to meet the approaching handler, or the handler has to give it another command to stay with the helper, the exercise and the rest of “C” will then be interrupted (terminated).

8. Defense of an Attack from the Guarding Exercise: 20 points

a) Commands

Commands to “out”, go to basic position, and march (move out) = Aus, Fuß, etc.

b) Performance

After Exercise 7’s guarding phase of approximately 5 seconds, the helper undertakes an attack on the dog as advised by the judge. Without help or instruction from the handler, the dog must defend itself by energetic and strong grips. It may attack thereby only at the protective sleeve proffered by the helper. The dog is given two stick-hits during the course of the struggle and while keeping the grip. Only impacts on shoulder/withers area are allowed. Upon instruction of the judge, the helper stands still, and the dog must immediately release its bite. The handler can also give a command to “Aus!” after an appropriate waiting time.

If the dog does not “out” after the first command, the handler receives the judge’s order for up to two further commands to “out” (Aus!). If the dog does not release after these commands (one allowed and two additional) it results in a disqualification. During the command to “out” the handler must stand still, without otherwise influencing the dog. After the “out”, the dog must remain steady and close to the helper, and guard him attentively. On instruction for judge the handler goes in a normal walking speed and in a direct path to his dog, and takes it to himself with the command to heel to the basic position. The soft stick now will be taken from the helper.

A side transport of the helper over a distance of approximately 20 paces follows, to where the judge is waiting. A command to “move out” is permitted. The dog must be at the right side of the helper, so that the dog is between the helper and the handler. The dog must attentively watch the helper during transport, but it may not bother or pressure the helper, jump on him, or seize him. The group continues to the judge, the handler gives the soft stick to the judge, and “reports out” by announcing that the protection phase of VPG-3 has been accomplished. Before the judge begins his critique and evaluation for the public, and upon indication by the judge, the dog is told to lie down next to its handler.

c) Evaluation/Scoring

Any failure to meet the following important performance criteria results in appropriate deductions: fast and robust gripping, full and steady grip up until the “out”, and after that release, a close and attentive guarding of the helper.

If the dog in the process of guarding is slightly inattentive and/or slightly annoys the helper, about one point is deducted from the exercise. If the dog is very inattentive and/or strongly bothers the helper, around two points are deducted. If the dog does not guard the helper, yet remains at the helper, around three points are deducted. If the dog leaves the helper to meet the approaching handler, the exercise will be rated as Unsatisfactory/Faulty. If the dog leaves the helper before the judge instructs the handler to come closer, or if the handler gives commands in order that the dog remains at the helper, the exercise will then be interrupted (terminated).

Notes by the translator:

* Fuß = Fuss. Literally, “Foot!” (Heel!) The German language is undergoing modernization, and many words with the “esset” ß (looks like the Greek “beta” or English capital B) are being changed to a double-s instead. Thus, a castle (a Schloß) may now be a “Schloss” (German nouns are capitalized). Proper names retain the ß.
* Commands (imperative mood, whether emphasized or not) in the past always ended with exclamation marks. Now the trend is not to use them, although they really are useful in the context of dog training: Hier! Fuß! Platz! etc.
* This is a copyrighted translation/paraphrase of the 2004 rules, prepared by Fred Lanting, with experience as an SV judge as well as an author and a teacher of English. Reprint rights must be obtained before reproducing these. The SV-WUSV official Breed Standard is also available in understandable English, translated by the same author.
* Other translations available to websites and magazines: Show, Kör (Breed Survey), and SchH/VPG/IPO rules.

Š Fred Lanting, mr.gsd@netscape.com

Kinds of trials: Abkurzung Zulassungsalter (minimum age):

Schutzhund A SchH A 18 months?

Schutzhund 1 SchH 1 18 months

Schutzhund 2 SchH 2 19 months

Schutzhund 3 SchH 3 20 months

Fahrtenhundprüfung 1 FH l 16 months

Fahrtenhundprüfung 2 FH 2 20 months

Begleithundprüfung BH (was:12) 15 months (now)

Ausdauerprüfung AD 16 months (SV)

Wachhundprüfung WH 12 months (?)

Rettungshund- RTP 14 months

Tauglichkeitsprüfung

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