Utility and Reliability: PennHIP vs. SV and OFA Hip-Extended Views

Fred Lanting

First, some facts:

  •      The “standard” view (positioning of dog for X-ray pictures of hips) is not the best… it is not the most accurate way to determine the real quality of hips. OFA, SV, and other registries have the dog stretched out on its back with legs straight out on the table, for the X-ray picture. While this is good for showing joint deterioration at the time, it is not accurate in showing true looseness, and it is not good for predicting what the hips will look like in a few years, when perhaps the dog has already produced puppies that inherit its hip quality.
  •      Accuracy in diagnosis and prediction, using that old ventro-dorsal position (lying flat on its back) increases with age of the dog being “X-rayed” (radiographed). At one year of age, which is when the SV starts “certifying” dogs, accuracy in predicting mature hip quality is rather poor—only the worst are identified when young, so progress in reducing incidence of dysplasia is still relatively poor.
  •      The SV has recently required a second hip radiograph after a dog has produced a certain number of litters, but popular dogs will still have put far too many dogs on the ground by then. That means many buyers will be stuck with pups that have less than ideal hips or chances of being valuable to the bred in that regard.
  •      The greater the number of truly “normal” ancestors in the near pedigree, the greater the odds that your dog will have good hips, meaning that it will have a better chance of avoiding both orthopedic problems itself, and of passing problems along to descendants.
  •      The only technique that gives an accurate, early, and relatively unchanging look at hip quality is the PennHIP technique and evaluation service. It is an abbreviation for “(U. of) Pennsylvania Hip Improvement Program” developed at that university, and is available in a great number of countries. The German hierarchy (at least in the GSD world ruled by the SV) has typically, stubbornly resisted the better science of PennHIP and has thus condemned its members and followers to a world of limited improvement.

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What is a Dog?

There is and will always be considerable confusion among dog fanciers and other publics in regard to breeds of dogs and their relations to other dog-like animals. One of the words that some of us maintain is misused or, at least, used by various people in different ways, is “hybrid.”

Many dictionaries inadequately define hybrids as being “individuals produced by breeding (crossing) different races, varieties, species, etc.” Disagreements arise when the correspondents do not agree (even temporarily) on the same definition. If you include wolves and domestic dogs in the same grouping because there is no hindrance to one fertilizing the other and resulting in equally-fertile offspring, then I cannot agree to call the result a hybrid. No more than Chinese and Caucasian humans’ children are hybrids. A better term for either might be “mixed” (we use the term “mixed-breed” in speaking of dogs, but usually “mixed heritage” re humans). Since canids mate and produce offspring which in turn are just as fertile, I feel it is wrong to call them hybrids. Dingoes, coyotes, wolves, and domestic dogs are all really breeds of Canis (dogs, canids). Their offspring should not be called hybrids, but rather “crosses” just as we would call a Cockapoo a “cross.”  Continue reading

Twin Championship Dog Shows & Obedience Trials (Hyberabad, India)

Fred will be judging at the Twin Championship dog show & obedience trial.

Dates:  December 14th and 15th, 2013

Location:  HITEX International Exhibition Centre, Hitech City, Hyderabad

Fred will also be conducting a seminar on December 14th.

You can register at Hyderabadcanineclub.org and for more information you can email info (at) Hyderabadcanineclub (dot) org 

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Click on the image for a full sized view / to print it out.

Fred’s predictions with the 2013 Kassel Sieger Show

Fred’s predictions at the time (August 17, 2013):

I expect good VA recognition for Nino Tronje if he is shown (he’s mostly owned by Mort Goldfarb), plus Enosch Amasis, Omen Radhaus, Mentos Osterbergerland, Quattro Partnachklamm, Labo Schollweiher, Etoo Wattenscheid (if his bitework is good enough), Fulz Zenevredo, and Yankee Feuermelder. The Furbo son Leo Zenteiche might be VA, as he is owned by Christoph Ludwig (very influential) though there is pressure this year to vary the bloodlines more.

The Remo son Figo Nordteich stands a good chance, and the Vegas son Tyson Fixfrutta does, too.  The Enosch son Kronos stands a chance, too… I was very impressed with him last year. Others who will place very high include: Ballack Brucknerallee, Schumann Tronje, Chacco Freiheit Westerholt, Iliano Fichtenschlag, Yoker Pendler, Pepe Kuckucksland, and Pacco Langenbungert. Continue reading

USCA Sieger Show – Lake Geneva, WI May 10-13, 2013

Expert handler has classes available for UScA Sieger Showusca2

 

May 10, 2013 weekend: I have classes available; let me know ASAP if you would like me to show your dog. I offer many years experience as an expert show handler, and as an SV breed judge. I know the judges well, what they are looking for, and what they want from handlers. Remuneration negotiable, but I ask for only a pro-rated share of my expenses, not any extra fee for handling. (The more dogs I show, the lower the amount.)

Whether or not I show your dog, I will have copies of my books available. You really should have the GSD book and the Orthopedics Disorders book, too. Order in advance so I pack enough for the trip.

German Shepherd Club of Jamaica specialty – Nov 2012

It was a great pleasure and honor to be invited again (my fourth time) to judge in Jamaica, and to find that fanciers continue to strive for balance and perfection while improving the average quality of the German Shepherd Dog here. I will give my observations on the adult classes first, then make some comments on other entries.

The top star of the show in my eyes was Ch. Veneze Dazz at Altel, a son of Arak de la Ferme Melgre Leau, a Sieger Zamp son; but Dazz bears more resemblance to his tremendous granddam Wendrina Kahler Heide who I think was VA-11 about a dozen years ago. Dazz is a medium-size, extremely well-balanced male with far-reaching fluid gait and true coming and going. Among the few that moved as smoothly were some of his offspring, so he obviously is producing high quality, and is not just a flash in the pan. Continue reading

Dog-show Judging in the Land of Volcanoes

Although I have lectured and judged in some 30 countries, this was my first trip to the dogs in Iceland. The occasion was the semi-annual national dog show of the kennel club known as Hundaræktunarfélagið íshundar. Ishundar is affiliated with Federación Canina Internacional (the FCI that is headquartered in Spain) and International Kennel Union (IKU), which two recently cooperated to form an association, the “Cyno OneWorld Alliance” of more than 50 countries and still growing. As far as I know, I am the only American licensed by this alliance thus far.

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2010 Sieger Show Report

Sept. 3-5, 2010, Nürnberg (aka Nuremberg):


As most of my readers know, I have been sharing my impressions of the Sieger Show (known in Germany as the Hauptzuchtschau) for a couple of decades. In these years, I have been leading tour groups to this main breed show, with several subsequent days spent visiting notable breeders and local training clubs. I try to offer a mix of: 1. Intensive dog study (including teaching novices about the breed, the show, and the particular dogs; 2. Introductions to breeders (usually some of my group will buy a dog from one or more of them); and 3. Sightseeing. This compromise gives something to everyone.

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The New Knowledge of DM (“GSD Myelopathy”)

German Shepherd Dog Myelopathy, also known as DM for Degenerative (chronic and progressive) Myelopathy (spinal cord disease), or CDRM in the UK, is the first disorder that comes to mind when German Shepherd Dogs and spinal lesions are spoken of together. Almost peculiar to Shepherds, the first symptoms are usually seen at more than 5 years of age and typically last 5 to 30 or so months, perhaps a bit longer if aggressive measures are taken to forestall euthanasia. All accounts to date concede that there is great variation in age of onset: the youngest case reported to Glasgow researcher Pamela Johnston in the course of her studies for her doctorate at the University of Glasgow, Scotland was five years old, and the eldest 14 years, while the majority were about nine years old at first presentation. Most early signs are seen at or shortly after about 6 years of age, if the observer is experienced and keenly looking for it. In my experience, many cases drag on for 2 years, a few go three or more years, and several I have seen last little over 6 months. Continue reading

Q&A with Fred – GSD Toplines

Hi Fred,

I have been going back and forth on a topic close to my heart and part of what my decisions will be in regards to breeding… and that is toplines. I CANNOT stand the “arched” (or roached) toplines I see in the German showlines. I tried to get used to it, tried to train my eye to it, and I just can’t do it. It seems all of the showline males available have arched toplines from very slight in the “older style” dogs like Little Man (Leri Unesco) who I used for my first breeding to almost hinge-backed dogs. I see in just about every German showline litter that most of the puppies are hump-backed. I just can’t justify breeding that. And how do I justify that to buyers? Even the pet people know a deformity when they see it! Regardless of whether or not they are what wins in the German ring, and how the German judges try to explain it, it is NOT correct to the standard, and just based on anatomy and basic physics, it is NOT more efficient. In fact, in the case of hinged-backs, it is a perfect site for osteoarthritis to set in, complete with bone spurs, and that is not a good thing to happen around a spinal cord. Continue reading